World War II: The Allied Invasion of Normandy

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An American soldier who gained the comparative safety of a chalk-cliff, on a beach in Normandy, France, on June 8, 1944, after storming ashore from a landing-craft takes time out for a breather before pushing on. (AP Photo)

American paratrooper with assault equipment move along a road on June 8, 1944 in Northern France. Machine gun ammunition strung around the GI'S neck will soon be peuring through the weapon carried by the man at the left. (AP Photo)

Canadian invasion troops stand guard over the first German prisoners captured during the assault on France by Allied forces on June 6, 1944 along a 100 mile front on the Normandy coast between LeHavre and Cherbourg. Wounded soldiers are being treated, in the background. At extreme bear are German coastal fortifications of masonry, silenced by the invaders. (AP Photo)

On board the Captain Class Frigate H.M.S. Holmes when she formed part of the escort to the Navy�s big ships off Le Havre during their bombardment of enemy positions on the Normandy Coast on June 6, 1944. The 15-inch guns of the war ship shelling German invasion coast positions is shown. (AP Photo)

Following the first Allied landings on the French coast troops at once began to push inland. Passing through French villages, they were given a warm welcome by the inhabitants. 105mm self-propelled guns in action at the side of a field on June 6, 1944. (AP Photo)

Work horse of the unloading of an Army Sea Bee. These Rhinos (Ferries) bring huge loads ashore from the big ships lying off the shore on June 19, 1944. (AP Photo)

Inscription written in French on this grave of an American soldier made by French civilians in France on June 18, 1944. The soldier�s helmet tops the wooden cross. The American died in the fighting with allied troops fighting for the Cherbourg Peninsula. (AP Photo)

American and German soldiers who paid for the invasion of France with their lives lie on the French ground covered with sheets, awaiting burial on June 12, 1944. (AP Photo/Pool/Acme, Brandt)

(Brandt)

Planes, bombs and smoke make their individual patterns in the air over France on June 12, 1944 as Allied bombers drop explosives on Nazi installations while ground troops attack from the sea. One bomber is in trouble but those bombs will mean a lot of trouble to the Nazis. (AP Photo)

U.S. troops in the beachhead area in Normandy, France, use an anti-tank ditch on June 10, 1944, as a temporary first aid station. (AP Photo)

Allied troops leaving a landing craft to wade ashore in Normandy, France on June 9, 1944. Already ashore can be seen tanks and other war vehicles. (AP Photo)

A section of the mighty Armada of landing craft with their protective balloons make a grand sight as it ploughs towards the French coast, on June 8, 1944. (AP Photo)

American assault troops, members of an infantry unit, carrying full equipment which includes a machine-gun, move along a cliff on a beachhead, in Normandy, on June 8, 1944. (AP Photo)

American assault troops, having gained the comparative safety, of a chalk cliff enjoy a breather, in Normandy, on June 8, 1944, before moving on. Medics who landed with them treat the men for minor injuries. (AP Photo)

One of the deadly B-26 Marauder�s of the Ninth Air Force roar over the channel, on June 8, 1944, at a low altitude to blast gun installations and coastal defences while landing craft steam toward the French coast. . (AP Photo)

A group of American assault troops who stormed a beachhead and although wounded, succeeded in gaining the comparative safety offered by a chalk-cliff , in Normandy, France, on June 8, 1944, take time out for some food and a cigarette. (AP Photo)

Landing craft coming in to a beach in France on June 7, 1944, set American fighting men down on the continent for the invasion of Fortress Europe, as their comrades already landed form on the shore. (AP Photo)

A view from one of the troop transports as jeeps and men make a landing on the Normandy shore, in France, on June 7, 1944. (AP Photo)

Under cover of naval shellfire which formed a screen as the first men landed, American infantrymen wade through the surf to the shore in France, on June 7, 1944. On the right are the transports from which the men disembarked. (AP Photo)

The first landings were made in France by the Airborne Forces. The whole operation planned to take place with great precision was the result of many months of final preparations. Paratroopers are briefed before the take off on June 7, 1944. (AP Photo)

In this British Official Photo, balloons are inflated within a few yards of the craft during an invasion exercise in France on June 7, 1944. (AP Photo/Royal Air Force)

A returning B-24 Liberator of the U.S. Eighth Army Air Force passes over part of the invasion armada as the boats steam across the channel toward the coast of Northern France, on June 6, 1944. (AP Photo)

The spirit of these G.I.'s are high as their landing crafts set out for the shores of France, on June 6, 1944. (AP Photo)

Pvt. Ernest Barker, right, of Eastland, Texas, carries his guitar as he leaves a British port with reinforcements for the Allied beachhead in France in June 1944. (AP Photo)

Members of a British special service commando are having their kits checked before leaving for the Allied landing operations of the Normandy coast in France, on June 6, 1944. (AP Photo)

The first landings were made in France by the Airborne Forces. The whole Operations planned to take place with great precision were the result of many months of careful training. The men are seen making last minute preparations, etc., before emplaning. Paratroops sitting with their kits ready for emplaning in June 1944. They have a Union Jack which will be one of the first to be planted on French soil by our forces. (AP Photo)

Pair of landing craft hit Utah Beach in Normandy, France, June 1944. (AP Photo)

U.S. reinforcements wade through the surf from a landing craft in the days following D-Day and the Allied invasion of Nazi-occupied France at Normandy in June 1944 during World War II. (AP Photo/Bert Brandt) (BERT BRANDT)

American assault forces hurdle over the side of a Coast Guard LCI into a landing barge, which will bring them into the fight to liberate France, during the Allied invasion of the Normandy, in June 1944. (AP Photo)

American soldiers lie on stretchers and sit propped against a sea wall awaiting transportation back to England for treatment after being wounded in the Normandy invasion, northern France, June 1944 during World War II. (AP Photo/Peter J. Carroll) (PETER J. CARROLL)

German prisoners of war, captured during the Allied Normandy invasion, are marched to the ships that bring them into captivity in England, in June 1944, at Bernieres-sur-mer, France. (AP Photo)

An anonymous American soldier, who died in combat during the Allied invasion, lies on the beach of the Normandy coast, in the early days of June 1944. Two crossed rifles in the sand next to his body are a comrade's last reverence. The wooden structure on the right, normally veiled by high tide water, is an obstruction erected by the Germans to prevent seaborne landings. (AP Photo)

British and Canadian troops are seen as they seek cover behind a sand dune, southwest from Caen, during the Allied invasion of the Normandy in June 1944. (AP Photo)

A tribute to an unknown American soldier, who lost his life fighting in the landing operations of the Allied Forces, marks the sand of Normandy's shore, in June 1944. (AP Photo)

British Prime Minister Winston Churchill, left, reviews American troops at a base in England on the eve of D-Day, June 1944, during World War II. The initials AAAO on the steel helmets with a line across the As stands for "Anywhere, Anytime, Anyhow, Bar Nothing." The identification shoulder patches of the G.I.s are blotted out by the censor. (AP Photo)

U.S. reinforcements wade through the surf as they land at Normandy in the days following the Allies' June 1944, D-Day invasion of occupied France. (AP Photo)

The seas were calm off the Normandy beaches and unloading from various craft was in full swing. With the front established the process of unloading magnificent equipment goes on at a pace. Activity on the beaches as the vehicles are driven from the landing craft, tank, on to the beach in Normandy, France, on June 24, 1944. (AP Photo)

U.S. infantrymen wade through the surf as they land at Normandy in the days following the Allies' June 1944, D-Day invasion of occupied France. An allied ship loaded with supplies and reinforcements waits on the horizon. (AP Photo/Bert Brandt) (BERT BRANDT)

Marauders of the 9th Air Force bombardment group, fly over units of the Allied fleet as they approach landfall on the French coast, on June 21, 1944. Marauder groups such as these, fly constantly in close support of our advancing group forces. Their targets are enemy gun positions, bridges, railroad and highway junctions, convoys and troops concentrations. (AP Photo)

American reinforcements, arrive on the beaches of Normandy from a Coast Guard landing barge into the surf on the French coast on June 23, 1944 during World War II. They will reinforce fighting units that secured the Norman beachhead and spread north toward Cherbourg. (AP Photo/U.S. COAST GUARD)

Pfc. Jerry Casillo, of Buffalo, N.Y., cleans his rifle during a rare moment of rest while his fellow soldiers catch some sleep, on a beachhead at Normandy, France, during the Allied invasion, on June 15, 1944. His comrade on the right is Pfc. Rohde of Elmira, New York. (AP Photo)

Under heavy bombardment by German 88mm guns, American soldiers flatten themselves on the sand as they move up the shore, during Allied landing operations in Normandy, France, June 12, 1944. (AP Photo)

British troops, trucks, and ambulances stand on deck in readiness landing as the transport ship nears the coast of France, during the Allied invasion of the Normandy, on June 8, 1944. (AP Photo)

American troops loaded with equipment wade ashore Normandie, France on June 08, 1944, and make for their assembly point. Units of the invasion fleet are lying off shore all along the coast. (AP-Photo)

U.S. troops prepare to embark a landing craft, which will take them out to a larger ship lying off the coast, June 5, 1944, at a port in England. These soldiers are due to take part in the D-Day landings. (AP Photo/Peter J. Carroll) (PETER J. CARROLL)

U.S. serviceman attend a Protestant service aboard a landing craft before the D-Day invasion on the coast of France, June 5, 1944. (AP Photo/Pete J. Carroll) (PETER J. CARROLL)

British Commandoes assemble at a coastal port in England, June 4, 1944, in readiness for sailing to France for the liberation of Europe. (AP Photo/British Official Photo)

With his hair matted, and a weary but determined look in his face, this American soldier has his hand bandaged by a fellow medical officer, after he was wounded in battle in the early days of the Allied invasion of Normandy, France, in June 1944. (AP Photo)

U.S. Army medical personnel administer a plasma transfusion to a wounded comrade, who survived when his landing craft went down off the coast of Normandy, France, in the early days of the Allied landing operations in June 1944. (AP Photo)

With the combined efforts of U.S. Navy construction battalions and U.S. Army engineers, beachhead roadways fast become realities, providing a steady stream of supplies from LSTs to the fighting troops at the front, during the Allied invasion of Normandy, France, in June 1944. (AP Photo)