SOLAR ECLIPSE: Everything you need to know

TYLER, Texas (KETK) - On Monday, August 21, 2017, all of North America will be treated to an eclipse of the sun.

Anyone within the path of totality can see one of nature's most awe-inspiring sights - a total solar eclipse. This path, where the moon will completely cover the sun and the sun's tenuous atmosphere - the corona - can be seen, will stretch from Lincoln Beach, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. Observers outside this path will still see a partial solar eclipse where the moon covers part of the sun's disk.

WHO CAN SEE IT?

Everyone in the contiguous United States will be able to see the eclipse. In fact, everyone in North America plus parts of South America, Africa, and Europe will see at least a partial solar eclipse, while the thin path of totality will pass through portions of 14 states. 


WHAT IS IT?

This celestial event is a solar eclipse in which the moon passes between the sun and Earth and blocks all or part of the sun for up to about three hours, from beginning to end, as viewed from a given location. For this eclipse, the longest period when the moon completely blocks the sun from any given location along the path will be about two minutes and 40 seconds. The last time the contiguous U.S. saw a total eclipse was in 1979.

WHERE CAN YOU SEE IT?

You can see a partial eclipse, where the moon covers only a part of the sun, anywhere in North America. To see a total eclipse, where the moon fully covers the sun for a short few minutes, you must be in the path of totality. The path of totality is a relatively thin ribbon, around 70 miles wide, that will cross the U.S. from West to East.  The first point of contact will be at Lincoln Beach, Oregon at 9:05 a.m. PDT. Totality begins there at 10:16 a.m. PDT.  Over the next hour and a half, it will cross through Oregon, Idaho, Wyoming, Montana, Nebraska, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, and North and South Carolina.  The total eclipse will end near Charleston, South Carolina at 2:48 p.m. EDT.  From there the lunar shadow leaves the United States at 4:09 EDT.  Its longest duration will be near Carbondale, Illinois, where the sun will be completely covered for two minutes and 40 seconds.

WHEN CAN YOU SEE IT?

Times for partial and total phases of the eclipse vary depending on your location. This interactive eclipse map will show you times for the partial and total eclipse anywhere in the world.

You can also find solar eclipse start, peak and end times for East Texas in the list compiled below:

ALTO:

START: 11:45AM
PEAK: 1:15PM
END: 2:44PM

ATHENS:

START: 11:42AM
PEAK: 1:12PM
END: 2:42PM

BECKVILLE:

START: 11:45AM
PEAK: 1:16PM
END: 2:54PM

BIG SANDY:

START: 11:43AM
PEAK: 1:14PM
END: 2:43PM

BULLARD:

START: 11:44AM
PEAK: 1:14PM
END: 2:43PM

CARTHAGE:

START: 11:46AM
PEAK: 1:16PM
END: 2:45PM

CENTER:

START: 11:46AM
PEAK: 1:17PM
END: 2:46PM

CHIRENO:

START: 11:46AM
PEAK:1:17PM
END: 2:46PM

CUSHING:

START: 11:45AM
PEAK: 1:15PM
END: 2:44PM

DAINGERFIELD:

START: 11:44AM
PEAK: 1:14PM
END: 2:43PM

DIRGIN:

START: 11:45AM
PEAK: 1:15PM
END: 2:44PM

FRANKSTON:

START: 11:43AM
PEAK: 1:13PM
END: 2:43PM

GARRISON:

START: 11:46AM
PEAK: 1:16PM
END: 2:45PM

GILMER:

START: 11:44AM
PEAK: 1:14PM
END: 2:43PM

GLADEWATER:

START: 11:44AM
PEAK: 1:15PM
END: 2:44PM

HALLSVILLE:

START: 11:45AM
PEAK: 1:15PM
END: 2:44PM

HENDERSON:

START: 11:45AM
PEAK: 1:15PM
END: 2:44PM

HOLLY LAKE RANCH:

START: 11:43AM
PEAK: 1:13PM
END: 2:42PM

JACKSONVILLE:

START: 11:44AM
PEAK: 1:14PM
END: 2:43PM

JEFFERSON:

START: 11:45AM
PEAK: 1:15PM
END: 2:44PM

KILGORE:

START: 11:44AM
PEAK: 1:15PM
END: 2:44PM

LAKEPORT:

START: 11:45AM
PEAK: 1:15PM
END: 2:44PM

LINDALE:

START: 11:43AM
PEAK: 1:13PM
END: 2:42PM

LINDEN:

START: 11:45AM
PEAK: 1:15PM
END: 2:44PM

LONE STAR:

START: 11:44AM
PEAK: 1:14PM
END: 2:43PM

LONGVIEW:

START: 11:44AM
PEAK: 1:15PM
END: 2:33PM

LUFKIN:

START: 11:46AM
PEAK: 1:16PM
END: 2:45PM

MARSHALL:

START: 11:45AM
PEAK: 1:16PM
END: 2:45PM

MAYDELLE:

START: 11:44AM
PEAK: 1:14PM
END: 2:43PM

MINEOLA:

START: 11:43AM
PEAK: 1:13PM
END: 2:42PM

MT. ENTERPRISE:

START: 11:45AM
PEAK: 1:16PM
END: 2:45PM

MT. PLEASANT:

START: 11:43AM
PEAK: 1:13PM
END: 2:42PM

NACOGDOCHES:

START: 11:45AM
PEAK: 1:16PM
END: 2:45PM

NOONDAY:

START: 11:43AM
PEAK: 1:13PM
END: 2:43PM

PITTSBURG:

START: 11:43AM
PEAK: 1:14PM
END: 2:43PM

QUITMAN:

START: 11:43AM
PEAK: 1:13PM
END: 2:42PM

REKLAW:

START: 11:44AM
PEAK: 1:15PM
END: 2:44AM

RUSK:

START: 11:44AM
PEAK: 1:15PM
END: 2:44PM

SAN AUGUSTINE:

START: 11:47AM
PEAK: 1:17PM
END: 2:46PM

TATUM:

START: 11:45AM
PEAK: 1:16PM
END: 2:45PM

TENAHA:

START: 11:46AM
PEAK: 1:17PM
END: 2:46PM

TENNESSEE COLONY:

START: 11:43AM
PEAK: 1:13PM
END: 2:43PM

TIMPSON:

START: 11:46AM
PEAK: 1:16PM
END: 2:45PM

TROUP:

START: 11:44AM
PEAK: 1:14PM
END: 2:43PM

TYLER:

START: 11:43AM
PEAK: 1:14PM
END: 2:43PM

VAN:

START: 11:43AM
PEAK: 1:13PM
END: 2:42PM

WHITEHOUSE:

START: 11:44AM
PEAK: 1:14PM
END: 2:43PM

WINNSBORO:

START: 11:43AM
PEAK: 1:13PM
END: 2:42PM

To see how the eclipse will look in your area, click here and enter your zip code.

HOW CAN YOU SEE IT?

You never want to look directly at the sun without appropriate protection except during totality.  That could severely hurt your eyes. However, there are many ways to safely view an eclipse of the sun including direct viewing - which requires some type of filtering device and indirect viewing where you project an image of the sun onto a screen. Both methods should produce clear images of the partial phase of an eclipse. 


DIY PINHOLE CAMERA

You don't need fancy glasses or equipment to watch one of the sky's most awesome shows: a solar eclipse. With just a few simple supplies, you can make a pinhole camera that lets you watch a solar eclipse safely and easily from anywhere.

Before you get started, remember: You should never look at the sun directly without equipment that's specifically designed for looking at the sun. Even using binoculars or a telescope, you could severely damage your eyes or even go blind! Solar eclipses themselves are safe. But looking at anything as bright as the sun is NOT safe without proper protection. And no, sunglasses do NOT count.

Stay safe and still enjoy the sun's stellar shows by creating your very own pinhole camera. It's easy!

WHAT YOU NEED

2 pieces of white card stock

Aluminum foil

Tape

Pin or paper clip


STEP 1 - Cut a square hole

Cut a square hole into the middle of one of your pieces of card stock.

STEP 2 - Tape foil over the hole

Tape a piece of aluminum foil over the hole.

STEP 3 - Poke a hole in the foil

Use your pin or paper clip to poke a small hole in the aluminum foil.

STEP 4 - Try it out

Place your second piece of card stock on the ground and hold the piece with aluminum foil above it (foil facing up). Stand with the sun behind you and view the projected image on the card stock below! The farther away you hold your camera, the bigger your projected image will be.

To make your projection a bit more defined, try putting the bottom piece of card stock in a shadowed area while you hold the other piece in the sunlight.

STEP 5 - Get creative

For extra fun, try poking multiple holes in your foil, making shapes, patterns and other designs. Each hole you create will turn into its own projection of the eclipse, making for some neat effects. Grab a helper to take photos of your designs for a stellar art project you can enjoy even after the eclipse has ended.



KETK will bring you LIVE coverage of this historic event all day on Monday.

Stick with EastTexasMatters.com for all your 2017 eclipse news and updates.

 


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